Bavarian Vineyards irrigated by Israeli technology

15 July, 2016

Israeli Netafim cooperated in the deployment of an experimental irrigation system for Vineyards in Bavarian Lower Franconia. The Israeli technology is considerably cheaper than common technologies used in Germany

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Israeli Netafim cooperated in the deployment of an experimental irrigation system for Vineyards in Bavarian Lower Franconia. The Israeli technology is considerably cheaper than common technologies used in Germany

Netafim's drippers and control system deployed in Bavaria
Netafim’s drippers and control system deployed in Bavaria

Bavarian Lower Franconia is Germany’s most “arid” district, with a rainfall average of just 550 millimeter – no more than Israel’s coastal regions. Lately, the relative aridness is extenuated by another problem – long dry spells in summer, Germany’s rainier season. These dry spells affect one of the districts main agricultural crops – grapes. Lower Franconia is a traditional vineyard region, producing traditional wines. Though irrigation in Germany is not uncommon, it is very expensive, and normally used when acutely needed. This led the Bavarian Ministry of Agriculture to cooperate with Israeli irrigation specialist Netafim in search of advanced technological solutions.

Netafim and the Bavarian authorities started a pilot project –in which a decentralized irrigation system has been deployed. The system includes water reservoirs, an irrigation system and an advanced control system. The water reservoirs have been built in an advanced technology to passively prevent alga growth. The water stored in the reservoirs are pumped to the hilltops, from which they are distributed by trademark drippers.

Netafim’s technology has many advantages – it is cheaper than the common alternatives in use in Germany. In fact, the Bavarian ministry of Agriculture reports that Netafim’s system costs 8,000 Euro per hectare, compared to 20,000 Euro per hectare in common technologies. Another advantage of Netafim’s system is in flexibility, which makes it suitable for big agro-businesses as well as family held Vineyards and farms. The decentralised infrastructure is light and does not require the building of large structures, making it compatible with Lower Franconia rigid agricultural heritage conservation regulations.

Posted in: Energy & Environment